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CUSTOM CULTURE : The great custom families

"Customizing your motorcycle means making it your own. Although there are as many possible customization combinations as there are bikers, several major customization families have appeared over the last 70 years. To make it clearer, we have tried to list them for you: par Benzin

Par @antrach96

BOBBER The roots of motorcycle customization go back to the post-war era in the United States. Soldiers returning to civilian life after years in Europe or the Pacific used surplus army motorcycles (mainly Harley-Davidsons) and lightened them up by removing the excess. The custom culture was born, and the Bobber with it.

(The style: Brad Pitt at the red light)

BOBBER BRAD PITT BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

CHOPPER : The Chopper style was born a few years after the Bobber (still in the United States) and is an extension of it. The customization, still based on Harley-Davidson, goes further. For the first time, the frame of the motorcycle is touched by modifying, for example, the opening angle of the fork. The notion of practicality is still far from the profit of the pure and hard style.

(The style: Peter Fonda in Easy Rider)

EASY RIDER BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

CAFE RACER : The Cafe Racer was born in England and spread mainly in Europe in the 1970s. The bases of customization are varied, going from the Triumph Bonneville to the Kawasaki H2 through the BMW R60. The objective was to obtain a motorcycle able to compete with the others in wild races between two cafes (Cafe Racer NDLR). The recipe is often the same: strap-on handlebars for a forward racing position, single seat and high half fairings for the more advanced. We also start to touch the mechanical part of the bike to increase the power.

(The style: Joe Bar Team)

JOE BAR TEAM CAFE RACER BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

SCRAMBLER : The scrambler, besides the eponymous model of the Triumph catalog, is a customization style aiming at making the bike usable on the roads or even in the sand by being inspired by the cross-country bikes of the 1970s like the Triumph Scrambler (the real one, the one of Steve McQueen, not the Ducati Scrambler of Thomas our sales manager). Here again, the recipe is often the same: wide flat-bar handlebars for the control of the bike, side exhaust with high passage and semi-cross tires (we'll add headlight grilles and high mudguards for the more aesthetic ones).

(The style: Steve McQueen and his Triumph).

Steve McQueen SCRAMBLER BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

BRAT STYLE : The brat style is a sub-group between the Cafe Racer and the Bobber. It is characterized by a systematic modification of the rear loop of the frame of the motorcycle to install a custom flat two-seater seat. Also known as the "Japanese Bobber", it was born in the land of the rising sun and takes its name from the store where it was born.

(The style: This KZ650 prepared by Piston Trigger)

BRAT STYLE BRATSTYLE BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

TRACKER : Tracker style is a derivative of flat track motorcycles, an American sport of turning as fast as possible on a dirt track. The special feature is that the competition bikes have no front brake and have specific tires optimized for left turns. Civilian customizations are mostly based on Harley-Davidson Sportster bikes. The Indian FTR 1200 is the only production example of this on the market.

(Le style: Evel Knievel)

EVEL KNIEVEL TRACKER BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

BOZOZOK : A real Japanese counter-culture movement, Bozozoku does not only affect motorcycles but also cars. There is no real rule, the goal is to make as much noise as possible and to have the most exuberant motorcycle (or car) possible.

(The style: This gentleman)

BOZOZOKU BENZIN MOTORCYCLES

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